A Night with the Stars

by Steven Ward

The jokes were crude; the jabs were humorously cringe-worthy; the performances and guest appearances were nostalgically awe-inspiring; and there was no shortage of glamour with the star-studded attendees. In every sense of the connotative meaning of the word, the 85th annual Oscars was a spectacular spectacle that celebrated the past year of filmmaking.

Seth MacFarlane did not disappoint when it came to his constant controversial jibes at those both present and not present; most notable being his grudgingly talented dance number titled, “We’ve Seen Your Boobs,” an ode to those woman who have shed more than implied in their time on the silver-screen. A small exchange with the beloved William Shatner, who reprised his role as Cpt. Kirk to chastise and warn MacFarlane for the disaster he might have unleashed upon the Oscars.

Apart from the expected polarized criticisms and appraisal that MacFarlane has received for hosting the multi-billion dollar event, the ceremony ran surprisingly smooth and swift.

The Taiwanese veteran director Ang Lee took home the coveted best-director for his metaphysical-adventure “Life of Pi.” Lee was a shocking but well-deserved upset next to the monumental legend Steven Spielberg and his documentary-drama “Lincoln.” It was Lee’s film that emerged on top, attaining four awards throughout the night.

Following close behind was “Argo” and “Les Miserables” with three awards each. It was Affleck’s “Argo” that was crowned best picture by none other than first-lady herself Michelle Obama, who appeared via jumbo-tron to advocate for the arts across the nation and to announce the award.

The ever-humble Daniel Day-Lewis accepted the award for actor in a leading role for his astounding work in “Lincoln,” by thanking his competitors as “equals” and “betters” as he called them. A quirky and adorable Jennifer Lawrence was so excited at the announcement she had received the award for actress in a leading role that she tripped on her way up stage, drawing the swift movements of both Hugh Jackman and co-star Bradley Cooper. Her humor was not lost in the fall, commenting on the standing ovation she received, saying the audience only did so because they felt bad for her trip.

For those actors and actresses in a supporting role, Christoph Waltz won for his charismatic portrayal as a bounty hunter in “Django Unchained”; while the stunning Anne Hathaway received hers for her tear-inducing rendition of the doomed prostitute in the musical “Les Miserables.”

The inspiring and epic tale of a young ginger-princess with an itch for archery, “Brave,” managed a win in the ceremony as the best animated feature film of the year.

In retrospect, the trifecta of upsets from “Lincoln,” “Skyfall,” and “Django Unchained,” which each received two awards each, has resulted in one of the most even-handed Oscars in recent history. No film was able to achieve dominance or sweep its competitors.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •