Study Shows That E-Cigarettes Leak Toxic Metals

Jaime Aparicio, Reporter

Electronic cigarettes that are considered to be a safer substitute than normal cigarettes have been found not to be as safe as once thought. A study conducted earlier in February has shown that certain flavors used within e-cigarettes are particularly toxic to users. E-cigarettes work by heating the flavored liquid inside the vaping device which sometimes includes nicotine. It is also suggested that users who partake in vaping are possibly at a higher risk of cardiovascular problems or even cancer.

A study took place in which a team of scientists from John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, concluded that the safer substitute for cigarettes could indeed be harmful. Senior study author Ana Maria Rule and a team of researchers hypothesize that the reason for the toxic metals leaking from the process of vaping is the result of the heating coils within the vaping device itself,

“It’s important for the FDA [Food and Drug Administration], the e-cigarette companies, and vapers themselves to know that these heating coils, as currently made, seem to be leaking toxic metals — which then get into the aerosols that vapers inhale,” explained Rule. The findings of the study can be seen in the Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives.

Rule and her team have identified that the toxic metals released from the coils heating up include cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, and nickel. And upon testing various samples of liquids in vaping devices, Rule and the researchers found that “these were median levels only. The actual levels of these metals [including those of nickel, chromium, and manganese] varied greatly from sample to sample, and often were much higher than safe limits.”

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •