Future Teachers Mini Fair Emphasizes Teacher Shortage in California

Erika Suarez , Online Editor-In-Chief

 

Rio held their very first event for Future Teachers Monday, September 18 with presenters from Cal State Fullerton, Cal Poly Pomona, and Cal State Los Angeles discussing the credential programs offered for teaching.  

 

The Mini-Fair took place in the lower quad by Rio Café and transitioned to an information session with 3 panels in Room LR-128.

 

Agustin Cervantes, a director of Cal State LA and Recruitment Specialist Deanna Garay began the first panel. They provided information on programs such as the ULRN (Urban Learning Program). It dives into the field of teaching in an urban school and connecting with children with a wide range of learning needs that grow from cultural diversity, linguistic diversity, and special needs.

 

Cervantes lays out the significance of being a part of this growing field. He emphasizes the need for teachers of special education, science, math, and how the U.S is experiencing a teacher shortage. Mainly, California. The non-profit Learning Policy Institute reported a 35 percent drop in the U.S. of people studying to be teachers between 2009 and 2014. The number of available teachers had reached a 10-year low in 2016.

To make this change Cal State LA wants to work very closely with students aiming to become teachers. If you follow the STEM-CTE TEACH offered in Rio Hondo. You will be set for the ULRN program at Cal State LA. Options are specializing in a multiple subject credential or an education specialist credential.

Cervantes says confidently, “The guarantee that if you finish this program, you will have a class to teach.” You will have a guaranteed slot in a class and supplied with ongoing advising from the faculty.

“There will always be a need in teachers. We do get a lot of our students hired and we want to support that effort,” says Cervantes.

Cal State Fullerton’s CC Relations Coordinator, Taliah Chatterfield takes the next panel, discussing Titan Future Teachers. A two-semester program following a bachelor’s degree and a “pre-education” pathway for undergraduates.

Chatterfield says, “The school is flexible with you and some don’t have that option to go full time and they will work with you on your custom pathway. There are different options to get around things.”

The conversations they have with their students is graduation planning and if you can handle a certain number of units. A pending approval waits for their (MSMPP) Multiple Subject Preparation Program that waives the CSET for a teacher’s credential. Passing the CSET keeps you active as a Teacher for 10 years.

Dr. Heather Wizikowski and Joanne M. Van Boxtel presents the last panel for Cal Poly Pomona. Wizikowski says Cal Poly Pomona is identified as a socially mobile school. For their college of education and integrative studies.

The courses offered are after 4 pm for working students. Most of the courses are hybrid and helps non-traditional students. Once you finish undergrad, you can go into early childhood studies, liberal studies, single subject degree.

The teaching credential options at CPP are multiple subjects, special education, and single subject.

As for their special education pathways. The school’s students can choose from the traditional pathway, internship programs, or integrated teacher preparation program (ITEP).

The unfortunate decrease in teachers does lighten for those seeking a job in the field. An expected increase in open employment will open up 13,200 jobs by 2024. Students who are interested in Rio’s STEM-CTE/ TEACH program and want to make a positive difference in the teacher shortage should meet with a counselor.  

 

 

 

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