Russian Spies Hacked Winter Olympics as Payback

Jaime Aparicio, Reporter

Under a “false-flag” operation, Russian spies were found to be responsible for hacking the games of last year’s Winter Olympics. The cyber-attack, to which the games were held in South Korea, was first believed to be conducted by North Korea in an attempt to be framed by the Russian group. Russian spies wound up hacking hundreds of computers that were used by local authorities in the South Korean region. Though the attacks were closely monitored while the games continued, PyeongChang officials admit that a cyber-attack was first done during the February ninth opening ceremonies.

Due to the complications from the hacking of the system, disruptions were placed on the Internet, broadcasting networks, and even on the Olympic’s official website. The reason behind the hacking of the system was because of the olympic committee banning a Russian team member competing in the curling sport.

On the one hand it is extremely disappointing when prohibited substances might have been used, but on the other hand it shows the effectiveness of the anti‑doping system at the games which protects the rights of all the clean athletes,” expressed the committee.

Because of the harmful nature the ban held for the entire team of Russia, athletes from the country were still allowed to compete in the games but under the description “Olympic Athletes from Russia.” If by some chance Russian athletes did indeed win gold in any of the sport categories, the celebration of the victory and handing out of the medals would not be accompanied by the country’s anthem. Russian athletes were also not allowed to wear their country’s flag on any uniform worn during the Olympics because of the doping done by the curling athlete.

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