Rio Hondo College Newspaper

El Paisano

Event Horizon Telescope captures photographs of supermassive black hole

The+Event+Horizon+Telescope%2C+housed+in+MIT%2C+was+used+over+the+course+of+the+past+two+weeks+in+order+to+capture+several+photographs+of+the+super+massive+black+hole+residing+in+the+center+of+our+galaxy.+The+is+one+of+the+images%2C+illustrated+by+MIT+artists.+
The Event Horizon Telescope, housed in MIT, was used over the course of the past two weeks in order to capture several photographs of the super massive black hole residing in the center of our galaxy. The is one of the images, illustrated by MIT artists.

The Event Horizon Telescope, housed in MIT, was used over the course of the past two weeks in order to capture several photographs of the super massive black hole residing in the center of our galaxy. The is one of the images, illustrated by MIT artists.

Photo courtesy of National Geographic

Photo courtesy of National Geographic

The Event Horizon Telescope, housed in MIT, was used over the course of the past two weeks in order to capture several photographs of the super massive black hole residing in the center of our galaxy. The is one of the images, illustrated by MIT artists.

Jacobo Garrido, Staff Writer

For the first time in history, astronauts have taken photographs of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) as well as its surrounding region. With little research acquired throughout the years, much of the study on these SMBHs is limited to inaccurate methods.

In attempts to further our space exploration, a crew of international astronauts from four different continents around the world photographed a black hole in its entirety for the first time, capturing the center as well as the surrounding areas on Wednesday April 12th.

The photograph reveals how much is still unknown about these SMBHs. For example, the surrounding area is called the event center as it can produce energy in addition to consume matter making them very powerful.

The photograph was captured using the Event Horizon Telescope, which is the combination of multiple telescopes spanning across four continents. Each telescope is used as a reflective beam or mirror which allows us to photograph from 25,000 light years away. Scientists are trying to obtain more research on the surrounding areas as it is highly reactive to matter and energy.

The benefit in having multiple telescopes is that every station is studying the same SMBH, but getting multiple vantage points on one of the most strangest things in the galaxy. With over 500 terabytes of data yet to be examined, it was necessary to send the information to MIT Haystack Observatory in Massachusetts where supercomputers will turn the data into photographs.

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Rio Hondo College Newspaper
Event Horizon Telescope captures photographs of supermassive black hole