It’s Actually the Rich who are Spending more Money on Fast Food

Some would assume that people with less money eat more fast food, but it is not true. It is actually people who have more money to spend. A new report about American Fast food was recently conducted by the Centers for Disease Control which stated people eat more fast food when they have more money.

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey used techniques to examine American health. Based on their data, out of 10,000 adults who took a survey, over a third eat fast food each day. Such as pizza, chicken and other restaurants fast food. This all depends on how much the family eats and how much money they make above the poverty line.

A study conducted in the years of 2013-2016 by the CDC, people who earn less than the federal poverty line (usually a family of four) ate fast food daily. People above the federal poverty line with a family of four were daily consumers of fast food.

According to economists Jay Zagorsky and Patricia K. Smith conducted a study on fast food habits of Americans in their 40s and 50s found that people with less money were less likely to eat fast food than middle-class people.

Zagorsky and Smith noticed the more hours a person works, the more likely they are to eat fast food. The CDC was able to gather data based on fast food habits. People between the ages of 20 and 39 were most likely to eat fast food on any given day. Many people choose to eat fast foods as it does not require much time spent cooking and is very cheap. It is likely that people who earn less than the federal poverty line constantly consume fast food due to the price and calories.

Adults tend to consume fast foods during lunch as their “eating occasion” due to having breaks during work. There are many more fast food restaurants in poorer neighborhoods than people living in more expensive areas. Fast food restaurants believe they can attract more people to eat fast food in poor neighborhoods rather than rich ones.

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