The Daily Brew Open Mic

One+of+the+hosts+of+the+Daily+Brew+Open+Mic%2C+K.P.%2C+addresses+the+audience+at+a+Wednesday+night+show.+Members+of+the+audience+raise+their+hands+to+show+their+support.+
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The Daily Brew Open Mic

One of the hosts of the Daily Brew Open Mic, K.P., addresses the audience at a Wednesday night show. Members of the audience raise their hands to show their support.

One of the hosts of the Daily Brew Open Mic, K.P., addresses the audience at a Wednesday night show. Members of the audience raise their hands to show their support.

Michael Khuraibet

One of the hosts of the Daily Brew Open Mic, K.P., addresses the audience at a Wednesday night show. Members of the audience raise their hands to show their support.

Michael Khuraibet

Michael Khuraibet

One of the hosts of the Daily Brew Open Mic, K.P., addresses the audience at a Wednesday night show. Members of the audience raise their hands to show their support.

Michael Khuraibet, Digital Editor-in-Chief

On the first Wednesday and third Friday of every month, a little coffee shop at the corner of Montebello and Whittier Boulevards hosts a showcase of local talent for its customers. The Daily Brew Coffee Bar in Montebello holds an “open mic,” a variety show where people perform music, poetry, and comedy. Last Friday, I attended as both a guest and a performer.

When you walk into the Daily Brew, the atmosphere is cozy and dimly lit. The Wednesday show is considered the “workshop,” where performers rehearse new material. Its audience is much more casual (and perhaps more open) on Wednesdays. Friday, on the other hand, is considered the “showcase,” after the material has been refined.

The Daily Brew hosts invite performers to share a message of “peace and love,” which most commonly takes the form of poetry. Poets addressed a wide range of topics from heartbreak and loss, to dissatisfaction with the current social climate. One poet compared courting someone in person versus online, saying “I really like you,” in reference to social media.

Many of the performers share deep, profound material. Others are more lighthearted and open to being received at least partially in jest, but still personal. A singer performed a song called “Glenn,” which opens with running into an ex-boyfriend with his new girlfriend at a taco shop. The song is charming, even when it’s revealed the singer hopes her ex is left broken-hearted.

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, I am a big fan of standup comedy. As a result, I brought a friends to watch me perform. I was the only comic for the night, so the audience was keen on the change of pace and dynamic. Even when some of the jokes became a little edgier, the crowd was still receptive. After I left the stage, one of the hosts said, “Some of those made me cringe, but in a good way,” before inviting me to perform next time.

Even members of the Daily Brew staff got up on stage to perform, including the owner, Terry. He performed a cover of a song featured in the movie, “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” A further testament to the supportive nature of the crowd, Terry and audience members bantered back and forth between verses.

The night concluded with the hosts of the show inviting performers to share links to their social media platforms on a white board, in order to gain more recognition; I gained one follower on Instagram as a result.

At first, the thought of performing something you’ve written for strangers is a terrifying prospect. However, a place like the Daily Brew, where support for fellow artists thrives, is a place where anybody who has an idea in their heart is welcome to perform it. In doing so, you’ll hear supportive snaps of encouragement from audience members, or, if you’re a comic, a few laughs.

The next open mic will be held Wednesday, April 4.

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