Capturing Constant Change and Movement: Richard Lopez’s Art Reception

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Capturing Constant Change and Movement: Richard Lopez’s Art Reception

Ron Reeder and friends at the Rio Hondo Art Gallery on March 18.

Ron Reeder and friends at the Rio Hondo Art Gallery on March 18.

Noah Garcia / El Paisano

Ron Reeder and friends at the Rio Hondo Art Gallery on March 18.

Noah Garcia / El Paisano

Noah Garcia / El Paisano

Ron Reeder and friends at the Rio Hondo Art Gallery on March 18.

Noah Garcia, Staff Writer

An artist showcase was held in the RHC Art Gallery on March 18 celebrating the works of former teacher Richard A. Lopez. The event was full of family, friends and art fans alike as his friend and colleague Ron Reeder, gave a speech about his friend’s life and works.

He talked about his time with the artist and how he saw the progression and development of the different pieces Lopez had created. He was always consistent in representing the finite and the infinite, and he emphasized the relationship between light and movement.

One of his most important series was inspired during the first couple of years he worked at Rio, because he painted the people who worked in the strawberry fields that used to be right across from the school’s entrance. He would marvel at the synchronicity of the workers and tried to capture the dignity and beauty of the people who worked there.

Reeder then introduced Lopez’s wife, Trina Lopez, who introduced their children, grandchildren, and Lopez’s brother, who all were very appreciative to see Lopez’s art being put on display. She then introduced her friend Alicia, a former counselor to the fine arts students, who told how the Lopez’s met and called it the “Pico Love Story.”

The Dean of Arts welcomed all of the guests and thanked everyone for coming to the event. For the rest of the showcase, the audience discussed and enjoyed the Art, with several snacks and drinks provided.

The different series that were represented in the gallery were: Floral, Architectural, Water, Farm Workers, Tango, and the Cosmos. The reception contained the most celebrated pieces from each of these series. Reeder stated that his favorite series in Lopez’s work was the Tango or Dance Captured moments. He said that the best part of the Art in general is the subtleties of a piece.

Lopez excelled in enunciating the little details of a piece, where as an entire piece looks very complicated and specific, but is very simple and bold. He loved how in each painting, he saw true art in concealing it, where you can appreciate it on multiple levels. There was also a table which displayed some of his sketches.

Lopez was born in 1943 and died on Aug. 29, 2013. He earned a Masters and Bachelors degree from Cal State Long Beach. He was a professor of drawing and painting from 1974 to 2005, when he worked diligently to give his students the best art experience he possibly could.

After 31 years of teaching, he retired and moved from his studio in Los Alamitos to San Pedro, where he continued to work on his art. As an artist, he believed that his works were a documentation of life’s constant changes and movements. He affirmed that any individual from all walks of life, could have vision, captivation, and could leave behind something meaningful to society.

His works of art will be on display in the art gallery from March 17 to April 19. For more information on Lopez, you can visit ralopezart.com. The Richard Lopez studio is located in San Pedro, where you can also see his works on display at San Pedro’s monthly Artwalk.

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